NPMA-33 WDI Inspection Report: Guidelines for completing the form

Get a detailed overview of guidelines for completing the new NPMA-33 Wood Destroying Insects (WDI) Inspection Report.

Form NPMA-33 MUST be used by wood destroying insect (WDI) inspectors to report the results of WDI inspections for any HUD/VA guaranteed property transactions. 

The NPMA-33 is also typically used for conventional transactions. 

If a state, through regulation or statute, requires the use of a state-approved form and excludes the use of all other forms, the state-mandated form must be used.

Under generally accepted practices, it is the responsibility of the inspector/inspecting company to inspect for and report on visible evidence of wood-destroying insects and visible damage.

Inspected areas of the structure(s) inspected may vary according to local and regulatory requirements and practices.

If the state in which the inspection is conducted has prescribed procedures for inspections, those should be followed in conducting the inspection. The NPMA-33 does not preempt state requirements for inspection practices and reporting. 

If no state guidance exists, the inspection procedures should be in accordance with this document.

Before starting the inspection process, inspectors should read and understand the NPMA-33. If completing the form by hand, a fine point pen is recommended.

Section I. General Information

This section is for reporting general information about the location of the inspection and the inspecting company.  All boxes in this section must be filled out completely. 

  • Inspection Company, 
  • Address, and 
  • Phone Number 

Enter the business name, address and business phone number of the company performing and reporting the results of the inspection.

  • Company’s Pest Control Business License Number: Enter the business license number of the company conducting the inspection activities. This is the state license to conduct pest control or pest inspection activities. In states where no business licenses are issued, enter “not required.”
  • Date of Inspection: Enter the date on which the inspection was conducted. If it was done on more than one date, enter all dates that the property was inspected.
  • Address of Property Inspected: Enter the complete physical address of the property.
  • Inspector’s Name, Signature & Certification, Registration, or License Number: Print the full name of the inspector who conducted the inspection. The inspector must then also sign the report and enter his/her certification, registration, or license number issued by the state pest/pesticide control regulatory agency.
  • Structure(s) Inspected: List all of the structures on the property that are part of the report (for example: “house and detached garage”). The person ordering the inspection should specify which structures need to be inspected.

Any findings are restricted to visible evidence in, on, or under the structure including the structure itself and areas beneath any portion of the structure such as crawls, basements, and porches. Decks attached to the structure are considered part of the structure.

Areas beneath decks and roof overhangs, adjacent mulch, landscape timbers, tree stumps, woodpiles, etc. should NOT be reported in this section. The inspector may wish to note WDI evidence observations found in these areas under Section V (Comments). 

Section II. Inspection Findings

In this section, the results of the inspection are reported. 

Wood destroying insects, for the purpose of this inspection, include termites, carpenter ants, carpenter bees, and reinfesting wood-boring beetles. 

If more room is necessary, comments may be noted in Section V or by using attachments if such attachments are listed in Section V. 

The inspection reports conditions on the date of the inspection only and no warranty is provided by this report unless accompanied by an attachment and noted in Section V.

  1. No visible evidence of wood-destroying insects was observed. Check this box if there is absolutely no visible evidence (past or present) of wood-destroying insects in, on or under the structure as defined above. This box should NOT be checked if there is any visible evidence of wood-destroying insects.
  2. Visible evidence of wood-destroying insects was observed as follows: Check this box if there is ANY visible evidence of wood-destroying insects observed regardless of the extent or age of evidence. 

If box B is checked, at least one of the following boxes (1, 2, and/or 3) must be checked and an explanation, description, and location of the wood destroying insect evidence must be provided. More than one box may be checked, if appropriate.

  1. Live Insects; (description and location): Check this box if live wood-destroying insects were found. List the type and specify the general area(s) where the live insects were found. The areas listed should provide enough detail to direct other interested parties to the general area.
  2. Dead insects, insect parts, frass, shelter tubes, exit holes, or staining (description and location): Check this box if dead insects, insect parts, frass, shelter tubes, exit holes, or staining (carpenter bee droppings or scraped termite tubes) were found. Describe the evidence and specify the general area(s) where evidence was found.
  3. Visible damage from wood-destroying insects noted in the following area(s): Check this box and specify the general area(s) where the evidence was noted if visible damage caused by WDI was observed. The inspector should probe and/or sound readily accessible wood members.

The inspector is not a damage expert; damage is nothing more than visible evidence of either current or previous infestation. The inspector should not distinguish between structural and cosmetic damage. The report clearly states, “this is not a structural damage report”.

If the inspection company does provide damage evaluation and/or repair as an additional service, a separate contract should be attached and may be noted as an attachment in Section V.

Note that the next paragraph on the form clearly explains to the Buyer and Seller that damage, including hidden damage, may be present if box B is checked above. Further, if any questions arise regarding damage reported, a qualified structural professional should be contacted.

Section III Recommendations

The lenders, realtors, buyers, and sellers are looking to the inspector to make a recommendation as to what corrective measures may be necessary or prudent. The inspector should use his/her knowledge, training and expertise along with careful observation of the structure(s) being inspected when deciding whether or not a treatment should be recommended.

Live insects do not necessarily have to be observed during the inspection for the inspector to recommend a treatment. Examples may include: fresh carpenter ant or powder post beetle frass noted, carpenter bee staining or signs of subterranean termites with no documentation of previous treatment.

Wood Destroying Insect Treatment Recommendations

1) Termites

If live termites are observed in, on or under the structure, a treatment and/or corrective action should be recommended (regardless of whether or not the structure has been previously treated). 

If evidence of termites such as bodies, wings, fecal pellets, kickout holes, mud tunnels, carton nests, staining, or damage is observed and there is no documentation of

treatment that indicates that the infestation has been addressed, then treatment and/or corrective action should be recommended.

Regarding Subterranean Termites (which includes Formosan termites)

Treatment and/or corrective action should also be recommended for a structure that has been treated previously and shows evidence of an infestation, even if no live subterranean termites are observed if documentation of a treatment performed by a licensed pest control company does not exist. 

Treatment or corrective action may be recommended if a documented treatment has occurred in the past unless the structure is under warranty or covered by a service agreement with a licensed pest control company. 

If any documentation is presented after the report is completed, the inspector should not change the report but rather advise that documentation be provided to the lender or appropriate parties.

If a baiting system is installed but the inspector does not know whether the contract is current, the inspector may recommend a treatment for subterranean termites and should also note “unless there is a current baiting system service agreement in effect” or similar language. 

If any documentation is presented after the report is completed, the inspector

should not change the report but rather advise that documentation be provided to the lender or appropriate parties.

Reinfesting Wood Boring Beetles

If live, adult beetles are found in, on, or under the structure, or if any life stage of beetles is found within the wood, then treatment and/or corrective action should be recommended. 

If evidence of wood infesting beetles such as bodies, frass, exit holes or damage is observed and there is no documentation of treatment that indicates that the infestation has been addressed, then treatment and/or corrective action should be recommended.

2) Carpenter Ants

If live carpenter ants are observed in, on, or under the structure (trailing into building elements) then a treatment and/or corrective action should be recommended. 

If bodies/body parts, wood debris or other “frass” from carpenter ants or damage is observed and there is no documentation of treatment that addressed such evidence, then treatment and/or corrective action should be recommended.

3) Carpenter Bees

If carpenter bees are observed moving in or into and out of any structural members then treatment and/or corrective action should be recommended. 

If evidence of carpenter bees such as damage, entry holes, frass, staining, etc. is observed and there is no documentation of treatment that addressed such evidence, then treatment and/or corrective action should be recommended.

Note: It should be understood that these treatment recommendations are suggested guidelines. Every inspection is different and there may be special situations, mitigating factors, or state regulations, which could cause an inspector to make a recommendation that does not follow these general guidelines.

Section IV. Obstructions & Inaccessible Areas

Virtually every property will have some obstructed or inaccessible areas. The typical areas are listed with a key provided on the right side for ease of use. 

For example, if there were boxes stored against the wall in the basement, the walls were paneled, and there was ceiling tile, the box next to Basement would be checked and “1,3,7” would be listed. 

In addition, or in place of the key, a written description may be entered on the line. Additional areas may be listed under “Other” or in Section V.

Section V. Additional Comments and Attachments

List any additional comments from any section. This may include any pertinent information not previously listed such as documentation of previous treatment, photographs, or diagrams. Service agreement information, if any, should include the expiration date. 

If additional space is necessary, comments may be continued on the attachment and referenced on the Attachments line. List all attachments in this section. The Buyer will then know that there are important attachments to the report.

Signature of Buyer & Seller. 

The Buyer and Seller must sign and date the report. It is not the inspector’s responsibility to obtain these signatures. These should be obtained at closing by the Realtor or closing firm. 

The Seller’s signature signifies that the Seller agrees that all pertinent property history regarding WDI infestation, damage, repair, and treatment has been disclosed to the Buyer. 

The Buyer signs the form to indicate that they acknowledge receipt of a copy of the report. 

Page 2 – Important Consumer Information 

This page contains information for the consumer in order to explain the scope and limitations of the inspection. 

Inspectors should read and understand all information on page two. In addition, a maintenance advisory regarding integrated pest management is detailed for the consumer. 

Both the Buyer and Seller should agree to any corrective action and responsibility for corrective action. Under no circumstances is the inspector responsible for corrective action unless provided by a separate contract. 

A full understanding of the scope and limitations of the inspection cannot be gained without reading Page 2. 

Form NPMA-33 is copyrighted and cannot be reproduced in any manner without written consent of NPMA. 

If your state or area requires a wood-destroying organism report, NPMA has prepared a model of a Wood Destroying Organism Attachment to the Wood Destroying Insect Inspection Report. The attachment is designed to report fungus conditions. 

HUD and VA do NOT require an organism attachment as part of national requirements for HUD and VA loans. PCOs are free to adopt or alter the model Wood Destroying Organism Attachment for specific areas. It is not copyrighted and may be reproduced. 

For a free copy of the model attachment, send a self-addressed stamped envelope to NPMA Model WDO Form, 10460 North Street, Fairfax, VA 22030 or visit www.npmapestworld.org.

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